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Gabrielle Graessle

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Artist statement
“I paint all what surrounds me, what I see.
My work is intuitive and inspired by all what takes my interest.
All becomes form, enters into my drawings and paintings: animals, nature, fashion, films,
books, news, also feelings, music, images from childhood up to now, without restrictions.
I start my work intuitively with or without an idea. It takes then on a life of its own,
goes somewhere else entirely.
Often, I develop the ideas from my drawings and transform them into my paintings.
My paintings are colourful, figurative, kitsch and large, sometimes with text, mostly 180 x
260 cm, done with acrylic, spray and sometimes glitter.
I love large paintings, I like to be surrounded by my imagery, to immerse completely in my
world of images.
I work normally on 4-6 paintings at the same time and switch between drawings and
paintings, which frees me again and again and also leads to new topics………
I draw and paint without thinking, pin the drawings on the wall and don’t look longer at them.
The drawings are not looking for a result.
I live and work in a group of old cottages in the south of Spain where I have several studios
to paint and to draw.
I hate routine and I always listen to music when I work. I turn the music on and then I let it
happen.” – Gabrielle Graessle
Biography
Gabrielle Graessle was born in Zurich, Switzerland in 1956 and has been fascinated by
painting and drawing since she was a child. She attended Zurich Art School for 5 years,
where she completed a degree in graphic design. Her first exhibitions took place while she
was still a student. During this time, she made mainly black and white charcoal drawings
spontaneously depicting her personal imagery.
For 15 years, she was represented by various galleries in Switzerland. Many of her
charcoal drawings hang in private and public collections.
At the beginning of 2000, she and her partner emigrated to France and later to Spain,
where they built and redesigned old houses. For years they moved from one renovation
project to the next. At that time, her means of expression were mainly drawings and
sketchbooks.
In 2015, she settled down in Andalusia. She decided to immerse herself completely in her
imaginary world again and to express herself in large format, colored, intuitive and
figurative paintings.
Her studio is located in a group of old cottages in the middle of nowhere. There are no
distractions, and she can fully concentrate on her work in a secluded setting in nature. There
she works on several canvases at the same time, creating multiple series of paintings.

At the same time, drawings are still an important part of her work. These are spontaneous
expressions of her thoughts and stories. They are often the starting point for her paintings.
In 2020, she restarted to present her art at art fairs in Barcelona and Madrid, and participated
in group shows in Germany and France.

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Katharina Arndt

Katharina website

Katharina Arndt is a Contemporary artist from Germany who lives and works between Berlin and Barcelona. She studied Fine Arts at Braunschweig school of art and later on obtained her Master of Fine Arts by John Armleder. 

She does this through artificial mediums such as PVC film, lacquer paper and Plexiglas with glossy acrylic paint and lacquer markers, using glossy texture to represent our plastic and materialistic culture. The focus of Arndt’s practice is the observation of digital communication and the portrayal of mass consumption in the digital age. Her cartoon figures are a reflection on how we express ourselves in the digital arena and how we are becoming ever obsessed with the digital world whilst losing ourselves in the physical.  Fast, reduced, almost childlike, motifs and medium  ironize the contemporary mass consumerist aesthetic of a decadent, abundant society in picturing her everyday life.

Many paintings with beach references, sunburns, and even Spanish brands of drinks like beer cans or juices can see the influence of Barclona on Arndt.  She also thinks clothes and accessories give a perfect impression of the spirit of the age we are living in. The stark contrast between reality and fantasy in her artworks reflect the artist’s livelihood in her young age in the East side of Germany, back when there wasn’t any food in supermarkets. She is deeply perplexed by the absurdity of our modern day-to-day activities and behaviors, and adopts a seemingly childish way of painting as an attempt to step back and look at things as they genuinely are.

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Benjamin Spark

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Born in 1969, Boulogne-Billancourt, FRLives and works in Brussels Benjamin Spark’s visual language freely samples from art history and popular culture, redeploying canonized styles and genres alongside graphics borrowed from youth subcultures and the commercial mainstream.

Spark’s complex pictorial worlds include quotations from artists like Lichtenstein, Warhol, and Basquiat, as well as song lyrics, brand logos, video games, cartoons, and magazine covers. He subverts the locked-in comic book universe, juxtaposing Disney stars, superheroes or the denizens of Franco-Belgian comic strips, then leaves them dirtied and defaced with a spray-paint graffiti attack. “I take these icons and ridicule them, to illustrate a sort of disorder in their world,”he says, “I’m exploding the frame that holds them in, soiling them a bit. The characters become the background and the tag comes to the fore.” 

Spark admits being a frustrated comic strip author/artist. “I dreamed of it as a boy, but could never come up with a good story,” he says. Instead he went into the web design business. Mid-life crisis came early and by 30 he dropped everything to start painting. After flirting with tribal-influenced art brut, known as ‘outsider art’ in English, Spark developed his own style, amalgamating pop and graffiti art. He cites Icelandic post-modernist Erro and New York street artist Jean-Michel Basquiat among his influences, and changed his name in tribute to the designer Philippe Starck. Having abandoned Paris, Spark now works out of a studio in a converted brewery on the mean streets of Brussels. “I fell in love with Brussels… it’s the place be.”

More than any artist of his time, Spark exemplifies what art historian Daniel Birnbaum calls “painting in the expanded field,” his prolific oeuvre reflecting the prepackaged newness and hybrid spaces of the Information Age.

 

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Austyn Taylor

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For 7 years Taylor has worked in studios around the world as a resident artist. Formerly trained as a painter and philosopher in New York and once an art teacher for the youths of Denver, Colorado she has lectured on sculpture and art history at UCLA, CCA, SFAI,
MSU, CCAFA and Alfred University. Currently based in Mendocino, CA, USA.

Taylor’s sculptures illustrate the absurdist humor (cognitive dissonance) one has when trying to hold both “realism” and “optimism” as one’s values. She uses imagery from hand-drawn animation, modern art and ancient sculpture to drum home friendly adages like, “everyone is trying their best.”

Austyn Taylor’s artistic vision grows from a pop-folk aesthetic drawing from animism and animation. The sculptures give body to mercurial consciousness, transforming and navigating different bodies. Her visual thesis centers on belonging, the inner strength conjured in alienation and the surprising joy of unconditional love. Her work is for all folks, it functions to be accessible while holding curiosity at depths which sensitive authorities can explore.

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Albert Pinya

Albert Pinya

Albert Pinya is an ultra-contemporary artist who lives and works in Palma, ranked among the Top 100,000 globally, and among the Top 1,000 in Spain. 

In Pinya’s universe, everything is simple, energetic and dynamic.  His work is based on a deliberate and ironic ingenuity that manages to dismantle the perverse structures of reality. He takes inspiration from movies, TV series and cartoons, and has quickly developed his own identifiable style, in which applies the codes of popular culture, comics, illustration and a thoughtful naive aesthetic that hides a precise treatment of the themes he explores. 

The artworks of Pinya are a continuation of the rich tradition of pop art, begun in the second half of the 1950s by artists such as Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenberg and Richard Hamilton. Pinya’s work, although no stranger to socio-political and ecological reflections, seems to laugh, in effect, at the dogmatic gravity that for some is the paradigm of our time. The works show lubricious linear forms, entering and exiting from different orifices, forming complex circuits and deep, pulsating spaces

His work denies “l’ art pour l’art” and regards art as a means of expression, which should be eminently communicative and always be based on an ideology. That is, rather than talking about ‘artistic creation’ we should talk about ‘artistic reaction’. Painting, drawing, intervention, installation, performance, graphic work and sound are the means with which he develops the discourse of his narrations. One of his greatest obsessions focuses on the study and observation of human beings and the way they establish relationships with society and with the environment.



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Akihiko Yoshida

Akihiko Yoshida

Over the past few decades, Yoshida has produced more than 10,000 works, ranging from small items such as belts to large works over two meters high. However, each work is important to him, and no work is Again, each piece is carefully crafted. From softly sculpted objects to expressive figures, Nikichi hopes to bring laughter to everyone through his work, an art that embodies the warm feelings of Yoshida.
Yoshida’s sculptures are visually as ethereal and light as porcelain. What makes people unexpected is that they are carved from a whole piece of wood. There is no sense of stagnation in traditional woodcuts at all. Every piece of work has its own aura. , very lively. In recent years, Yoshida’s creative themes are mainly animals. These animals record the artist’s daily thoughts and thoughts, which can be said to be his spiritual diary. Through anthropomorphism, the artist seeks to express in animals the universality of joy, sorrow and sorrow that humans experience. If you look closely, you can see that the eyes of the animals are closed, giving a sense of serenity, reverence and security, and, interestingly, the artist composes a lovely poem for each piece.

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Cai Yi Xiu

Cai Yi Xiu

In 2008, Cai Yi Xiu became an apprentice of Su Xiaobai, a noted chinese lacquer painting artist in the world. 

To Cai Yi Xiu, art is the playground of solitary. His works act as the bridge between him and the physical world. As his new project, Cai Yi Xiu often falls into a status, of which he feels the nature within and self without. Artist throw himself into the paintings with iterative lacquer layers, through the trace of time, the medium develops into the superimposed image of substance and self. 

At first glance, the works of Cai Yi Xiu seem to ignore formalism in many ways. His works are not about expression or abstraction. The artist ignores the essence of time and the dedication of how the universe converges. He left all the materiality behind, such as tone, temperament, composition, only to focus on perception and immersion of the richness in his manifesto on spatial. Through his artwork, viewers can be spiritually redeemed.



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Jose Macias

Jose Macias

Hyperbole: A rhetorical figure of thought that consists of exaggerating or  diminishing what is said. 

“These landscapes are called hyperbolic for obvious reasons. They are  exaggerated landscapes, exacerbated with large oil fillings and with an almost  sculptural pretense. The roots are fundamentally expressionist and in the  horizons only the horizon line would be left to arrive at pure abstraction. In This  horizon line, heaven and earth, contaminate each other, making it impossible to  discern where one begins and where another ends. It produces its contemplation  or memory, which is why it is a type of painting that wants to directly appeal to  emotion, to that spring that almost always remains asleep and which is beyond  our control.

These landscapes change into a different and emotional language. My intention  is that the viewer, when looking at them, feels that a set of emotions and  sensations of some memory that floats or resides sheltered in some unknown fold  of that immense drawer that makes up memory are relived. It is about painting painting, visceral and primal without further pretense. 

When I paint I do not seek to make a copy of reality. On the contrary, what I want  is to represent a parallel reflection where landscapes are evoked, intuited or  apprehended from the fragility of a memory or of an instant. A kind of emotional  flash where memory recovers a landscape like a reverie, like a spark caused by a  slight memory file that swarms through our heads and that sometimes wants to  come alive again. So they don’t look like reality, nor do they need to”.

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Viktoria Veisbrut

Viktoria Veisbrut

Viktoria Veisbrut was born in 1991 in Sosenskiy town, Kaluga region. In 2015, she graduated from Tula State University with a degree in graphic design. Initially, she worked as a master of artistic tattooing, but over time, the type of art changed towards monumental and easel painting. Now the artist is trying new media, such as sculpture and digital art.

Viktoria Veisbrut works under the influence of the Internet. Its presence here and now is the defining feature of today’s world, a multitude of parallel universes in one place. With the rapid development of technology, this phenomenon is becoming more and more universal, and not as an independent system, but as a part of life. Undoubtedly, this process leaves its mark on people, makes irreparable changes in the way of thinking, transforms conflicts and creates new ones. Viktoria Veisbrut depicts complex world, being inspired it and living it every day.

The artist lives and works in Moscow. She has presented numerous personal exhibitions in Russia, between Moscow and Kaluga, and she has participated in group exhibitions not only in Russia, but also in France and China.

She comes to Italy for the first time thanks to the art gallery Zanini Arte.